One Health Headlines: Friday, February 27, 2015

In this week’s One Health roundup: WHO worries that flu viruses are sharing genetic material quicker; Texas health officials search for a boy who had possible rabies exposure from an infected dog; mapping proteins in lizard venom may aid in the development of new drugs; and much more.

Read more »

Posted in Uncategorized |

One Health Headlines: Friday, February 13, 2015

In this week’s One Health roundup: Researchers at UC-Davis veterinary school study how newborn foals may offer clues to autism; China reports five more human cases of H7N9 bird flu; Iowa St. University veterinary researcher studies the impact of disease and climate change on an African camel herd to strengthen food security and human health; and more.

Read more »

Posted in Uncategorized |

One Health Headlines: Friday, February 6, 2015

In this week’s One Health roundup: A new study sheds light on the complex exchange of parasitic worms between wildlife, rats and humans; The World Health Organization is still concerned about the spread of Saudi MERS virus, which has been linked to camels; Wyo. state veterinarian urges caution to those handling birds, after avian flu confirmed in several western states; and more.

Read more »

Posted in Uncategorized |

One Health Headlines: Friday, January 30, 2015

In this week’s One Health roundup: Researchers from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine help develop a new treatment for rabies; the second case of H7N9 bird flu has been confirmed in Canada, in the husband of the country’s first patient; researchers aim to sequence feline genomes to help in fight against diabetes and asthma in people; and much more.

Read more »

Posted in Uncategorized |

Disease from farmer to soldier… how are they connected?

By Azureen Erdman

You might already know there are a number of diseases that you can get from your farm animals. One such disease is known as Q fever, caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Though your animals might appear healthy, shedding can occur through the fetal membranes, placenta, milk, urine, and feces. Manifestation of this disease in your animals could be seen with late-term abortions, stillbirths, retained placentas, endometritis, and infertility.  It is believed only 40 percent of humans exposed to Q fever will show any signs, and a majority of those who show signs will just appear with “flu-like” symptoms for a few days. Two to five percent of exposed humans will develop respiratory infections.  More symptoms can manifest from this disease, however rare. Contact with a sheep, goat, cow, or cat during the birth process is the most common source of disease for humans. Once this bacterium is shed into the environment, it can survive on its own and be spread by wind to infect a human with no contact to livestock. In fact, multiple reports of Q fever have been seen within various armed forces groups around the world.

Read more »

Posted in Zoonoses/Shared Disease | Tagged , , ,