Tag Archives: bats

Minnesota man learns lesson after rabies scare

A man in Minnesota says a rabies scare taught him a lesson: if you wake up to find a bat in your bedroom, don’t shoo it away and let it outside — capture it and have it tested. Sven Sundgaard of Saint Louis Park, Minn. said the bat brushed against his face as he slept, and he shooed it away, not thinking he’d been bit. Bats have tiny teeth, though, and a bite may not always be apparent. While a small percentage of bats carry rabies — about 6 percent of those submitted for testing — it’s better to be safe than sorry, experts say.

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Nine children in Louisville treated for rabies

To avoid rabies, you shouldn’t handle bats or other wildlife, especially if they appear ill. Recently, nine children in Louisville, Ky. were treated for rabies after a bat tested positive for the disease. The children were carrying the bat in a box and playing with it.

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Experts look to bats as possible origin of MERS

Scientists don’t know much about Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome (MERS), but a team investigating the disease in Saudi Arabia says it likely originated in bats. Currently it’s difficult to tell people how to avoid the disease — which hasn’t reached the United States — because so little is known about it. The New York Times has more in its article on scientists’ efforts to trace the origins of MERS.

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What to do if you find a bat in your bedroom

What would you do if you woke up in the middle of the night and found a bat in your bedroom? A lot of us might be alarmed. Some of us might be clear-headed enough to leave the room, close the door, and call animal control. And some of us might do what Ann Hawthorne of Washington, D.C. did and open a window to let the bat fly out.

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IRIS found in bats with white-nose syndrome

Throughout the past year, we’ve read several stories about white-nose syndrome in bats, in which a white fungus, Geomyces destructans, infects skin of the muzzle, ears, and wings of hibernating bats, according to the National Wildlife Health Center’s page on the disease.

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